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You may be thinking about adding a hardwood floor to your home, or maybe you've already decided for certain you are going to install one. But have you decided on the species of wood yet?


Oak Hardwood Flooring

Oak Hardwood Flooring

Oak is the most popular choice for hardwood floors in North America. If you've seen one oak, don't think you've seen them all. First off, it comes in red or white varieties, and within each species, there are a range of hues. The color of the white oak runs from creamy white to a light brown all the way up to a medium brown. Red oak tends to be reddish brown in color.

White oak flooring is harder than red oak, and it has a more uniform appearance. It is a heavy and hard wood, that has a medium bending strength and low stiffness. It's good at resisting wear.

Red oak flooring has an open grain that makes it more porous than white. Red is also hard and heavy, possessing a medium bending strength and stiffness.


Maple Hardwood Flooring

Maple Hardwood Flooring

Maple hardwood flooring varies from pale white to a light reddish brown. Its uniform texture is appealing, and it's a very hard wood, which means it's less likely to scratch or dent. It has a closed grain. Maple is a hard and heavy wood that has good strength properties. It's particularly resistant to wear and abrasion. A local tree, it's widely available in the United States and Canada.


Maple Hardwood Flooring

Pine Flooring

Unlike hardwoods such as oak and maple, pine is considered a softwood. That means it's more susceptible to dents, dings, and scratches, but it's still used for flooring, because many people appreciate the character of a worn floor. Knotty pine was the preferred flooring for Americans throughout the 18th and 19th centuries.

When paired with wide boards, it even now gives a home a rustic flair, making it popular with log and timber-frame home owners. You don't need to use wide boards however. As with hardwoods, pine is available in many sizes of planks.

One other perk of pine flooring is that because softwoods are generally less desirable than hardwoods, it can be had for less money than woods like oak and maple.


Brazilian Cherry

Brazilian Cherry

Brazilian Cherry from South America has a brownish-red color. It darkens from a tan/salmon color to a deep, reddish brown and is as hard as domestic Red Oak.

Brazilian Cherry is an extremely heavy wood; hard to cut, variable heartwood regarding color, from light brown to pink, to reddish brown, with some intense shadowing. Thick sapwood, notably differentiated, white slightly yellowed, uniform medium texture, regular to irregular grain of wood, rough and of poor shine surface; imperceptible scent and taste.